South Suburban Testing Sites for COVID-19

COVID-19 novel coronavirus test kit from the CDC
This is a picture of CDC’s laboratory test kit for SARS-CoV-2. CDC tests are provided to U.S. state and local public health laboratories and Department of Defense laboratories that were either previously qualified for being able to perform a similar type of test used to detect influenza or have been recently approved by their state public health laboratory for SARS-CoV-2 testing. (CDC)

Park Forest, IL-(ENEWSPF)- The following is a list of testing sites in the south and southwest suburbs for COVID-19. We also include guidelines for testing from the CDC.

Please note not all testing sites listed are managed by the Illinois Department of Public Health. This list will be updated frequently. If your lab is testing for COVID-19 and would like to be listed, please contact the Illinois Department of Public Health at [email protected]

The State of Illinois is announcing two additional Community-Based Testing Sites (CBTS) are opening to the public this week to help test Illinoisans for COVID-19. These new sites will open this week in Aurora (Wednesday) and Rockford (Friday). Illinois Community-Based Testing Sites are open seven days a week to test individuals with COVID-19 symptoms.

The sites listed below are distinguished by the name of the center first, the city where they’re located, hours of operation, says of operation, specific requirements, a website, if available, and a “hotline” number, if available.

For an up-to-date listing of testing sites in the state of Illinois, please go here.

VNA Health Care

  • Romeoville
  • 8:30am-3:30pm 8:30am – 12:00pm
  • Monday-Friday Saturday
  • Appointment required. Special instructions will be provided for walk-ups.

Morris Hospital

Aunt Martha’s Health and Wellness, Inc.

  • Joliet
  • 8:30am – 4:30pm
  • Monday/Tuesday/Friday
  • Appointment required. Must meet testing criteria established by IDPH. Capacity is limited.
  • http://auntmarthas.org

Family Christian Health Center

  • Harvey
  • 10:00am – 12:00pm
  • Monday – Friday
  • Appointment required. Televisit required prior to visit.

Aunt Martha’s Health and Wellness, Inc.

  • Chicago Heights
  • 8:30am – 4:30pm
  • Monday/Tuesday/Friday
  • Appointment required. Must meet testing criteria established by IDPH. Capacity is limited.
  • http://auntmarthas.org

IDPH Markham Drive-through

  • Markham
  • 8:00am – 4:00pm
  • Daily
  • No appointment required. Capacity is limited. Hours of operation subject to change on a daily basis, based on available equipment and throughput.
  • 1-800-889-3931

Christian Community Health Center

  • South Holland
  • 10:00am-3:00pm
  • Tuesday-Thursday
  • Appointment required.
  • 773-233-4100

Aunt Martha’s Health and Wellness, Inc.

  • Kankakee
  • 8:30am – 2:30pm
  • Tuesday – Thursday
  • Appointment required. Must meet testing criteria established by IDPH. Capacity is limited.
  • http://auntmarthas.org

Aunt Martha’s Health and Wellness, Inc.

  • Harvey
  • 8:30am – 4:30pm
  • Wednesday – Thursday
  • Appointment required. Must meet testing criteria established by IDPH. Capacity is limited.
  • http://auntmarthas.org

In order to ensure that social distancing rules may be eased, medical experts assert that more widespread testing must be available. “CDC has provided guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians,” the CDC says on its website. NPR reports, however, that many who need testing for COVID-19 still fail to get access.

Testing Guidelines from the CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers the following information on testing:

How to decide if you should be tested or seek care

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Here is some information that might help you make decisions about seeking medical care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. They may not need to be tested.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for people who have COVID-19.

CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

  • Clinicians should work with their state and local health departments to coordinate testing through public health laboratories, or work with clinical or commercial laboratories.

How to get tested

COVID-19 testing differs by location. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your medical provider first. You can also visit your state or localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find a place to get tested.

What to do after you are tested

  • If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take If You Are Sick or Caring for Someone.
  • If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your specimen was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. It is possible that you were very early in your infection when your specimen was collected and that you could test positive later. Or you could be exposed later and then develop illness. In other words, a negative test result does not rule out getting sick later.

Community transmission of COVID-19 is occurring in parts of the United States. In the coming months, most of the U.S. population will be exposed to this virus. You should continue to practice all the protective measures recommended to keep yourself and others from getting infected. See How to Protect Yourself.

Additional information: U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration FAQs on Diagnostic Testing for SARS-CoV-2external icon.

If you are very sick, get medical attention immediately

When to Seek Medical Attention

If you develop any of these emergency warning signs* for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: Notify the operator that you have, or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a cloth face covering before medical help arrives.

For healthcare professionals

For information on testing for healthcare professionals, see recommendations for reporting, testing, and specimen collection at Interim Guidance for Healthcare Professionals.